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TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. The Armenian File; Leon Picon
  2. Death and Exile; Daniel Pipes and Booknews
  3. Great Game of Genocide, The Armenian Massacres; N. Stone
  4. The Armenian Massacres; Ed Erickson
  5. The Armenian Rebellion at Van; Ed Erickson


THE ARMENIAN FILE Reviewed by Dr. Leon Picon

THE ARMENIAN FILE

THE MYTH OF INNOCENCE EXPOSED ambien online pharmacy

by Kamuran Gurun

One of the most eye-opening and reliably informative books regarding the false Armenian Genocide on record. Too bad it's not written by a Westerner, in case there are those of you who believe (justifiably) a writer's origin can determine his or her bias. However, there are more than enough excerpts taken from Western sources to set your minds at ease.

"We can easily state that propaganda is one of the weakest points of the Turks." [Gurun, File, p. 36]

With this simple, declarative sentence political scientist and former Ambassador Kamuran Gurun introduces us to one of the most concise but informative exposes ever written of the seldom-discussed, insidious role of the British anti-Turkish propaganda machine in spreading the Armenian "genocide" myth, during and for a period after World War I. The statement also points a finger at Turkey's complete apathy to the vast propaganda onslaught from the West. Most people who follow "The Armenian Question" with anything more than a passing interest are hazily aware that the Western Imperialist Powers were somehow involved in the spread of the exaggerated tales of unilateral massive atrocities in Anatolia. The degree to which the falsifications were actually an integral part of the Great Powers policies dra e instrumentalities which they used in disseminating their propaganda are usually glossed over or only vaguely hinted at by those who treat the history of the 1915-23 era in the Levant.

How successfully the Turks could have warded off the resultant stigma through counter-propaganda will never be known. But it is certain that in 1922 Sultan Mohammed Vl put it quite succinctly and pointedly, when he told the American writer E. Alexander Powell: buy ativan without prescription

"If we sent one, your newspapers and periodicals would not publish an article written by a Turk, if they published it, your people would not read it, if they read it, they would not believe it. Even if we sent a qualified person to America, to convey to you in your language, the Turkish point of view, would he find an impartial audience?" [Gurun, File, p. 37]

It was true throughout Ottoman history, and it remains almost as true today. Ottoman Turks obviously had never really felt the need to develop a propaganda machine. Turks today still retain an abiding contempt for propaganda. Turks of the Republic have on occasion tried to counteract with information programs the malicious falsehoods about their history and culture - and even this they have done only lately and with minimal successes. Blend together the normal Turkish reticence with the deftness of the English propaganda factory "Wellington House," add the zeal of the Western missionaries in exaggerating what had happened in Eastern Anatolia, and a monumental myth is born.

The Armenian File supplies us with fascinating insights into the activities of Wellington House, the distortions of truth which it circulated, and its relationship to British policy objectives. Throughout Gurun's book there are numerous useful illustrative quotations. Startling, but characteristic, is the following admission from The Armenians, published in 1916 by an Englishman, C. F. Dixon-Johnson:

"We have no hesitation in repeating that these stories of wholesale massacre have been circulated with the distinct object of influencing, detrimentally to Turkey, the future policy of the British Government when the time of settlement shall arrive. No apology, therefore, is needed for honestly endeavouring to show how a nation with whom we are closely allied for many years and which possesses the same faith as millions of our fellow subjects, has been condemned for perpetrating horrible excesses against humanity on "evidence" which, when not absolutely false, is grossly and shamefully exaggerated." [Gurun, File, p. 45]

"Wellington House," sometimes known also as the Masterman Bureau, turned out a mass of publications, authored by such famous British writers as Max Aitken, James Bryce, Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, Arnold Toynbee, and H. G. Wells. Such was the caliber of the propagandists whose writings flooded Western Europe, the Scandinavian nations, Russia, and America. Among their publications was a "blue book" on the Armenians published in 1916. In its first form it was a pamphlet entitled Armenian Atrocities, The Murder of a Nation. Since the original Wellington House edition of this pamphlet is no longer available, it cannot be compared with the reprint done in the United States in 1975 by an Armenian publishing house. Gurun points out that it is impossible for us to know today whether the Toynbee who wrote The Western Question in Greece and Turkey would have permitted the 1975 edition if he had been alive at the time of the reprint.

Or, consider still another prop in the building of the great Armenian myth: the role of the American missionary. Kamuran Gurun, in his study, has unearthed statement after statement drawn from the commentators of Russia, France, the United States, and Britain. Another quotation from E. A. Powell's writings states:

"The extent of the American missionary effort in the old Ottoman Empire is quite generally known, but its effect on American public opinion is not, perhaps, so widely recognized. Very early in their work the American missionaries discovered that Moslems do not change their faith, so, debarred from proselytism among the Turks, they devoted their energies to religious, educational, and medical work among the Christian minorities, particularly the Armenians. For half a century or more, these missionaries provided our chief sources of information on conditions in the Near and Middle East, and by them public opinion the United States on these subjects was largely mouIded . Having been rebuffed by the Moslem Turks and welcomed with open arms by the Christian Armenians, it is scarcely surprising that they espoused the cause of the latter and the reports they sent home and the addresses they delivered, when in America on leave of absence, were filled with pleas for the oppressed Christians and with denunciations of their Turkish oppressors. The congregations which supported the missionaries accepted this point of view without question, and there was thus gradually developed, under the aegis of our churches, a powerful anti-Turkish opinion." [Gurun, File, p. 30]

This "powerful anti-Turkish opinion," which Powell wrote about and which had been circulating all over America, makes it easier for us to understand Henry Morganthau's blind anti-Turkish attitude as reflected in his later book. His judgments were seriously colored by what he constantly heard unilaterally from missionaries at home and from those in Turkey when he was the American ambassador there. Although Gurun does not draw this direct connection in his treatment of Morganthau, on pages 240-41 of Gurun's book, there are revealed other fascinating political meetings which further show Morganthau's motivations and underlying bias against the Turks.

The foregoing paragraphs of this review, it must be noted, deal only with a tiny but characteristic fraction of the book's contents. They were chosen simply to be illustrative of the mass of documentary material that appears in this concise book. In seven pages of introduction and 323 pages of text, indices, a bibliography, and notes, Kamuran Gurun delves into every factor that has led up to the development of the Armenian Myth, from defining the Armenians and their origins; through the onset of the Armenian "question;" their position in the Ottoman Empire; the numerous attempts at insurrection; the recurrent acts of treason and involvement with Russia, particularly when Russia was at war with the Ottomans; the treachery during World War I, the decision to relocate the insurgents, and the ensuing problems of implementing that decision; and, finally, the aborted civil war within the Turkish War of Independence. In treating the activities of the Armenians during the period surrounding World War I, Gurun describes the rise of the Dashnagtsutune, the territorial agreements the Armenians made with Russia over Turkey's eastern provinces, and the beginnings of Armenian underground activities and terrorism. And every statement and event is thoroughly documented, frequently from Armenian sources. In short, this book tells the complete story concisely. One is tempted to say "too concisely," for the volume seemingly has more documentation than narrative analysis. Anyone who takes up this book for bedtime reading makes a mistake; it is not a running account of the development of a people nor is it easy reading as history. The book is, however, what its title says it is: a file, a dossier, not of an individual, or even of a people. It is a file which undoubtedly constitutes the most compact, fully documented, chronological treatment of the birth of a malignant myth of innocence which has plagued the Western world for nearly a century. It is a source book of information, drawn not only from official and unofficial documents but also from the histories, commentaries, and other accounts written by Armenians as well as "outsiders."

No one who ever deals with the Armenian issue in the future can fail to take this book into account. Difficult though it may be to get started reading The Armenian File, every Turkish-American should have access to it. It should be in the university libraries and in the public libraries. It tells the story more completely and honestly than anything heretofore.

Published jointly by K. Rustem & Bro. and Weidenfield & Nicolson Ltd., London-Nicosia-lstanbul, it is not yet easily obtainable in American bookstores. Copies are obtainable now for $29.95 +$1.50 (shipping and handling) by calling Customer Service at 212-647-5151 or writing to:

St. Martin's Press
175 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10010

Readers of this review may wish to consider presenting copies to their local public and university libraries.

The book is that important.

(Holdwater: The St. Martin's Press information may be outdated. A large part of the book is available online;)


Death And Exile The Ethnic Cleansing of Ottoman Muslims, 1821-1922

The Darwin Press, Inc.
Princeton, New Jersey ISBN
0-87850-094-4
by Justin McCarthy

Death and Exile is the history of the deportation and death of millions of Muslims in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries from areas that have remained centers of conflict - the Balkans, the Middle East, and what was the Soviet Union - and shows how these ethnic and religious conflicts developed. The history of the expansion of the Russian Empire and creation of new nations in the Balkans has traditionally been told from the standpoint of the Christian nations that were carved from the Ottoman Empire. Death and Exile tells the story from the position of the Turks and other Muslims who suffered death and exile as a result of imperialism. nationalism, and ethnic conflict.

Death and Exile radically changes our view of the history of the peoples of the Middle East and the Balkans. it presents a new framework for understanding conflicts that continue today.

About the Author:
Justin McCarthy, Professor of History at the University of Louisville, is a historian and demographer who has written extensively on the people of the Balkans and the Middle East. Among his previous works are: The Arab World, Turkey, and the Balkans (1982); Muslims and Minorities: The Population of Ottoman Anatolia and the End of Empire (1983); and The Population of Palestine: Population History and Statistics of the Late Ottoman Period and the Mandate (1990).

Book Review

By Daniel Pipes
Middle East Quarterly

Death and Exile: The Ethnic Cleansing of Ottoman Muslims, 1821-1922.

By Justin McCarthy.

Princeton, N.J.: Darwin, 1995, $35.

McCarthy has unearthed a horrifying and extremely important fact: that in the course of the century between the Greek war of independence and World War I, the Ottoman Empire suffered five and a half million dead and five million refugees. He deems this Europe's largest lost of life and emigration since the Thirty Years War. Christian suffering in this time and place is well-known; McCarthy shows the other side, that "Muslim communities in an area as large as all of western Europe had been diminished or destroyed." His study minutely reviews the regions and wars, pulling information from foreign and Ottoman sources to produce a compelling account.

Beyond the tragedy involved, this pattern of death and exile has a profound historical importance. To take just three matters that the author raises: It puts into perspective the deportation of Armenians in 1915 and turns this from an act of hatred into one motivated by fear (had the Armenians, with Russian support, rebelled, Ottoman Muslims could have expected to be slaughtered). Also, this legacy explains the modest and circumspect foreign policy pursued by Ataturk; "as a land of recent refugee immigration and massive mortality," his country was ready not to assert itself but to reform itself. Lastly, the massive immigrations to Anatolia mean that modem Turkey is (like France) an ancient land of migrants; McCarthy estimates that one-fifth of the population descends from nineteenth-century refugees. This fact also helps understand the country's acute sensitivity to current problems in Bosnia and Azerbaijan.

A more extensive review of "Death and Exile"

Booknews, Inc. Review,
June 1, 1996

A carefully researched history of Muslim mortality and migration in the areas of Anatolia, the Crimea, the Balkans, and the Caucasus during the late 19th century and through World War I. The history of Russian expansion has traditionally been told from the Christian viewpoint. McCarthy history, U. of Louisville) adds an important dimension to the tragic circumstances of imperialism, nationalism, and ethnic conflict. which resulted in the death of millions of Muslims and Turks. The volume provides a framework for understanding conflicts which continue to plague the Middle East and Balkans. Includes maps and tables. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Chapter One: The Land To Be Lost

In 1800, a vast Muslim Land existed in Anatolia, the Balkans. and southern Russia. It was not only a land in which Muslims ruled, but a land in which Muslims were the majority or, in much of the Balkans and part of the Caucasus, a sizeable minority. It included the Crimea and its hinterlands, most of the Caucasus region, eastern as well as western Anatolia, and southeastern Europe from Albania and Bosnia to the Black Sea, almost all of which was within the Ottoman Empire. Attached to it geographically were regions in Romania and southern Russia in which Muslims were a plurality among different peoples. By 1923, only Anatolia, eastern Thrace, and a section of the southeastern Caucasus remained to the Muslim land. The Balkan Muslims were largely gone, dead or forced to migrate, the remainder living in pockets of settlement in Greece, Bulgaria, and Yugoslavia. The same fate had overcome the Muslims of the Crimea, the northern Caucasus, and Russian Armenia - they were simply gone. Millions of Muslims, most of them Turks, had died; millions more had fled to what is today Turkey. Between 1821 and 1922, more than five million Muslims were driven from their lands. Five and one-half million Muslims died, some of them killed in wars, others perishing as refugees from starvation and disease. Much of the history of the Balkans, Anatolia, and the Caucasus cannot properly be understood without consideration of the Muslim refugees and the Muslim dead. This is particularly true of the history of nationalism and imperialism. The contemporary map of the Balkans and the southern Caucasus displays countries with fairly homogenous populations, countries that were created in the wars and revolutions that separated them from the Ottoman Empire. Their ethnic and religious unity was accomplished through the expulsion of their Muslim population. In other words, the new states were founded on the suffering of their departed inhabitants. Similarly, Russian imperialism, still too often portrayed as the "civilizing" march of European culture, brought with it the deaths of millions of Circassians, Abhazians, Laz, and Turks. Nationalism and imperialism appear in a much worse light when their victims take the stage.

The Muslim loss is an important part of the history of the Turks. It was they who most felt the consequences of nationalism and imperialism. At a time when the Ottoman Empire was struggling to reform itself and survive as a modern state, it was first forced to drain its limited resources to defend its people from slaughter by its enemies, then to try to care for the refugees who streamed into the empire when those enemies triumphed. After the Ottoman Empire was destroyed in World War I, the Turks of what today is Turkey faced the same problems - invasion, refugees. and mortality. The Turks survived, but their nation was greatly affected by the events of the past century. The new Turkish Republic was a nation of immigrants whose citizens came from Bulgaria, Greece, Yugoslavia. Armenia, Georgia, Russia, Ukraine, and elsewhere. Like the Ottoman Empire before it, Turkey faced all the difficulties of integrating an immigrant population and coping with massive wartime destruction while it was trying to modernize and survive. The challenges of that struggle shaped the character of the Turkish Republic.

Despite the historical importance of Muslim losses, it is not to be found in textbooks. Textbooks and histories that describe massacres of Bulgarians. Armenians, and Greeks have not mentioned corresponding massacres of Turks.

The exile and mortality of the Muslims is not known. This goes against modern practice in other areas of history. It has rightly become unthinkable today to write of American expansion without consideration of the brutality shown to Native Americans. The carnage of the Thirty Years War must be a part of any history of religious change in Europe. Historians cannot write of imperialism without mention of slaughter of Africans in the Congo or of Chinese in the Opium Wars. Yet, in the West, the history of the suffering of the Balkan, Caucasian. and Anatolian Muslims has never been written or understood. The history of the Balkans, the Caucasus, and Anatolia has been written without mention of one of its main protagonists, the Muslim population. The "traditional" view of the history of the Balkans, the Caucasus, and Anatolia is less than complete, if not misleading, because the histories of the Ottoman minority groups are taken out of context. A major part of that context is the suffering of Muslims, which took place in the same regions and at the same time as the sufferings of Christians, and often transcended them. The few who have attempted to alter the traditional view have been derided as "revisionists" as if revision were an academic sin and contextual historical accuracy irrelevant. In fact, revising one-sided history and changing deficient traditional wisdom is the business of the historian, and in few areas of history is revision so needed as in the history of the Ottoman peoples. The history that results from the process of revision is an unsettling one, for it tells the story of Turks as victims, and this is not the role in which they are usually cast. It does not present the traditional image of the Turk as victimizer, never victim, that has continued in the histories of America and Europe long after it should have been discarded with other artifacts of nineteenth-century racism.


Prof. Norman Stone Reviews: Bloxham's "The Great Game of Genocide" Lewy's "The Armenian Massacres"

(Note: Lewy's book must have been a pre-publication copy, and the title was subsequently changed to The Armenian Massacres in Ottoman Turkey: A Disputed Genocide.)

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Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">17-11-2015 <"SeawgAt="_ Tlf">mn O > /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/t started/18556-ahp-are-or c-t hewhich -of-est are -ahp-essut-rad-ahp-tion " the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">17-11-2015 essuteradcthattion " eawgAt="_ Tlf">edshmul or caA hewhich oeson-coun1> essuteradcthattion ley: /h4> /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/t started/18555-ahp-egrati-of-1915-rad-ahp-tmilonn-are-or c-ion u hy- -mng why-arabic-esrm c-Cpanonn-rstage.-nima lrad " the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">17-11-2015 edshEgratino ae Ameradcthat milonn-mul or caCon u hynivpubHng why (Arabic,sGpe, ,dSpanonn,t stage., Nima lrad )​ley: /h4> /div. /div. /div. /div. /div. /div. /div. /div. /div. div the="t3omodu he odu hetop-; miisthat -g mmatn" id="Mod172"> div the=" odu h-erser"> h3 the=" odu h-that ">li wi> div the=" odu h-ct"> div the="nspMrkeuetop-; miisthat -g mmat" id="nsp-nsp-172"0dsta- Gefig="{ 'aiimt con_speed': 400, 'aiimt con_ tr ie ': 5000, 'aiimt con_fun posi': 'Fx.Tnal ies s.Expo.f thIn', 'ults_columi': 1, 'ults_rows': 4, 'lmen _columis_licail': 0, 'lmen _licail': 0 }"> div the="nspAgnesboayed" /a> div the="nspTopli wioric"> a han ="#" the="nspPs a">Ps aley: a han ="#" the="nspN"es">N"esley: /div. div the="nspAgnScuod 1"> div the="nspAgnScuod 2 nspPe Ot4"> div the="nspAgnPf. N than hnspCol4"> div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/20322-isg rd-ahp-a u cte (-cruerpatt-pions, e -by-ahp-aul or cp-o -ahp-acasus, a-efugee" the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">02-06-2016 &e Am;edshA oftioisRsg rdcthatA u cte ( Cruerpatt Pions, e mbohe TtAul or cp licthatAcasus, anPfugee&e Am;ley: /h4> /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/19612-are-or c-c ti m-rre-oitgee-with-mythd othcal-g whe s" the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">17-02-2016 “mul or caC ti m'Are Oitgeedm a pMythd othcal S whe s” ley: /h4> /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/19598-tmilonn- ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">14-02-2016 &e Am;emilonneL /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/19592-tmiley-es-unawrre-of-ahp-serte (in w-of-are-or c-essut" the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">13-02-2016 Unawrreeworhe iSerte (in waof.Arsued beIssut”"SeawgAt="_ Tlf">“emileymi'>Unawrreeworhe iSerte (in waof.Arsued beIssut”ley: /h4> /div. /div. div the="nspAgnPf. NnspCol4"> div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/19573-sm aza lrad- wea-oup-razed-ahp-are-or c-c ti m-rad- Mythed s" the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">10-02-2016 &e Am;Sm aza lrad CweakHaisRazedcthatArsued beC ti m'Aad1SMythed s&e Am;ley: /h4> /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/19322-are-or -es-increanse ov-bsg mse -a-rstage.-puns;t" the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">25-12-2015 Increanse ov Bsg mse At stage. Puns;t&e Am;"SeawgAt="_ Tlf">&e Am;Arsued mi'>Increanse ov Bsg mse At stage. Puns;t&e Am;ley: /h4> /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/19146-bsse -stuck-o -est are -does- yonse -for-tmilm-rad-are-or cs" the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">12-12-2015 &e Am;Bsse 1SMuck On “on-coun1” Does Nyonse iFd hemilsWAad1Are-or cs&e Am;ley: /h4> /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/18616- tr inlt-with-aslra-yavuz-e r-senior-ncieitong -at-" xer-for-euraage.-rs t s" the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">22-11-2015 I tr inltdm a pAslra Yavuz Şir,iSenior Scieitois,eGamC xer for Euraage.1SMut sley: /h4> /div. /div. div the="nspAgnPf. NnspCol4"> div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/18486- tr inlt-with-vakkup-doga trkin-her aer-of-eeathl-aondon-N-cult wil-exch ces" the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">11-11-2015 I tr inltdm a pVakkup Doga trkiniFdr aer oesoloCalimondon-NiCult wil Exch cesley: /h4> /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/18485- tr inlt-with-dr-tmigut-kerem-tmncel-exs;=t-ruley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">11-11-2015 I tr inltdm a pDr.hemigut Keremhemncel,tExpert/R /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/18444- tr inlt-with-alev-f tic-dilitmor-of-" xer-for-euraage.-rs t s-avim" the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">05-11-2015 INTERVIEW WITH ALEV KILIÇ, DIRECTOR OF CENTER FOR EURASIAN STUDIES (AVIM)ley: /h4> /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/17053-u -finr cns-sepenianst-rugime-of-nagorno-karabakh" the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">04-02-2015 ‘US Finr cnsiSepenianst Rugime Of Nagorno K stbakh’ley: /h4> /div. /div. div the="nspAgnPf. NnspCol4"> div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/13256-ae.-wp-are- yo-avoil it-ahp-are-or c-essut" the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">09-01-2013 ean: WatAre Nyo Avoil it Are-or caIssuteley: /h4> /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/11160-mccurdy-pruley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">05-02-2012 McCurdy: Pru /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/10899-qfrr cn-should-be-immediately-rumoved-from-minsk-groupq" the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">03-01-2012 &e Am;Frr cn Should BetImmediately Rumoved From Minsk Group&e Am;ley: /h4> /div. div the="nspAgnhnspCol1" /a> a han ="/Fng why/ tr inlts/10786-frr cn-is-sorry-for-caunse -are-or c-blood-to-be-spithe " the="nspIof. Wrins;=atunft funft" /a>ley: p the="nspI dhnspI d1atunft fnull">22-12-2011 'Frr cn IsiSorryiFd hCaunse Are-or caBlood To BetSpithe 'ley: /h4> /div. /div. /div. /div. /div. /div. /div. /div. /div. div the="t3omodu he odu hethat -g mmatn" id="Mod167"> div the=" odu h-erser"> h3 the=" odu h-that ">Libraryley: /Cpan> div the=" odu h-ct"> div the="custom that -g mmat" s.

ley: br />lbr />lbr />lbr />la han ="http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmes/2014/ex/g mm/g mmunith t. fit -46861.pdf"SeawgAt="_blank">ley: br />lbr />lbr />lbr />la han ="http://www.eraren.org/"SeawgAt="_blank">ley: /td> ley: br />lbr />la han ="http://www.ere-orsorunu.est.tr/"SeawgAt="_blank">ley: br />lbr />la han ="http://www.jg wh.org/discivpu/10.2307/1455208?uid=2&uid=4&sid=21106078995431"SeawgAt="_blank">ley: br />lbr />la han ="/rof. s/WhoAre emilsebook.pdf"SeawgAt="_blank">ley: /td>
/div. /div. /div. /div. div the="t3omodu he odu hefootr _e-oun" id="Mod118"> div the=" odu h-erser"> div the=" odu h-ct"> div the="efootr _e-ou"> /div. div id="fb-root"> /div. script>(fun posi(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.estEleartesByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.estElearteById(id)) {rptmin;} js = d.createElearte(s); js.id = id; js./rc = "//g rsect.oricbook.net/en_US/all.jg#xfbml=1&appId=560182767336426"; fjs.parentNoe .insertBefore(js, fjs); }(t starte, "script", "oricbook-jssdk")); /Ccript> div the="fb-like-box" dsta-han ="https://www.oricbook.g m/ahpFng whyoftruth" dsta-nian ="320" dsta-colorschear="lperi" dsta-heperi="420" dsta-show-tioee="trut" dsta-show-bordhe="trut" dsta-stream="falst" dsta-htm.he="falst"> /div. /div. /div. /div. div the="t3omodu he odu hethat -g mmatn" id="Mod210"> div the=" odu h-erser"> div the=" odu h-ct"> div the="custom that -g mmat" s.
ley: br />lbr />la han ="/Fng why/t started">ley: br />lbr />la han ="/cthedwhy-vre od">ley: br />lbr />la han ="/Fng why/ebooks">ley: /td>
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